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Not completely finalized, but this is my allotment planting plan for 2009. I’ve rotated the beds from last year so hopefully that should work in my favour. I’m also going to try making some willow branch wigwams soon to grow my peas and beans over. I’ve got a large willow tree looming over my plot and pinching all the light so I think some serious pruning is in order.

Plus I’ve starting some indoor sowing and after a beautiful day today, it finally feels like spring has really sprung. I can’t wait to get going!

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Nice article by Dan Pearson in this week’s Observer magazine on what to grow on your allotment this year.

Dan Pearson - Got to pick a packet or two

Dan Pearson - Got to pick a packet or two

I think I might take his advice on the french beans this time round as the dwarf variety I grew last year were buckling under their own weight midway through the season:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/lifeandstyle/2009/feb/08/gardens

I must be really getting into this growing lark as spent the last hour or so transcribing a vegetable sowing and planting calendar that I got with a copy of ‘Grow your own‘. I’ve posted it here (in excel format) for people to download. It’s designed to print landscape on A4. Let me know if you have any problems downloading.

Download at https://raggedradishes.files.wordpress.com/2011/04/growing_calendar.xls or click on the image below.

Vegetable Chart

Some early starters for 2007 ready for the cold frame – from herbs and strawberries to caulis and annuals.

I started some carrot and onion seeds a couple of weeks back in my coldframe to see if I could get a head start on 2007. They’ve just begun to germinate over the last few days – going to keep an eye on these little guys across the season – although I’m not expecting prize winners…

To keep track on the crops I’m planning to grow and the various sowing times I’ve created myself a list. I’m going pop back and update this when I finalise the plan:

  • Basil Sweet Genoese: Mar – May
  • Beetroot Boltardy: Spring – Early Summer
  • Butternut Squash Pilgrim: Mar – April
  • Butternut Squash Barbara: Mar – April
  • Calabrese Marathon: March – Jun
  • Climbing Bean Fasold: April – Jul
  • Courgette De Nice a Fruit Rond: Spring
  • Courgette Defender: April – May
  • Cucumber Futura: Feb – May
  • Lettuce Flamenco: Mar – Jul
  • Parsley Lisette: April – Aug
  • Pepper Apple: Mar – April
  • Salad leaves Niche (mixed): Mar – Sep
  • Tomato Black Cherry: Feb – April
  • Tomato Ferline: Mar – April

I was going to do lots of research on the right things to grow but I got carried away and have ordered a bunch of seeds to get me started, no doubt there will be a number of other frenzied seed buying stints, but for now here’s my list:

  • Calabrese ‘Marathon’ F1 (Brocolli)
    “The commercial best-seller – producing large heads on sturdy stems. Can be sown and harvested successionally over a very long period.”
  • Cucumber ‘Futura’ F1
    “An all female variety which has good resistance to powdery mildew. Heavy cropping, slim long fruits.”
  • Lettuce ‘Flamenco’
    “This delicious improved red oakleaf will add colour and flavour to salads. Resistant to mildew and is slow to bolt.” – which is handy!
  • Pepper (Capsicum) ‘Pepper Apple
    “Mild and juicy, almost apple-like flavour and distinctive top shape. Quick to mature in variable weather conditions, you can pick green or, if you can wait approx. 3 weeks when red.”
  • Squash ‘Pilgrim Butternut’ F1
    “A selection of the ever popular Butternut family with a less vigorous vine habit. It exhibits outstanding resistance to cracking and has long storage ability. Good sweet orange flesh (Semi-bush type).”
  • Squash, Butternut ‘Barbara’ F1
    “Attractive high quality ‘butternut’ variety, with a unique green and orange stripy pattern o the outer skin. The interior flesh is sweet and an intense orange, which is high in beto-carotene. Stores well if kept in a frost-free room after harvest.”
  • Basil ‘Sweet Genovese’
    “This is an aromatic herb which has many culinary uses, particularly popular in Mediterranean dishes.”

More about Ragged Radishes…

Ragged Radishes is the garden allotment blog of Lucy Crosbie (that's me). As a novice allotment owner, I took on plot no. 27 at the Burras Lane site in Otley, West Yorkshire in Oct 2006. I've now moved to a lovely house with a large garden in Knaresborough.

Have a read, or just a nosey around and please feel free to comment on my posts and photos...

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